Posts Tagged ‘Banteay Kdei’

SOTM World Tour – Cambodia’s Temple History

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Angkor Wat is big. It’s famous. It’s so revered by Cambodians, it’s on the country’s national flag.

But is it any good?

I think it’s ok. It is worth visiting, but not for too long. Bits of it are impressive and as it’s regarded as probably the world’s largest religious structure, it demands respect.

The temple is actually part of the Angkor Archaeological Park, which contains the remains of the different capitals of the Khmer Empire that date from the 9th to the 15th century.

It’s the most famous site on the park, so we stopped there first. But really it’s just a huge temple complex, with many plain parts, and with lots of faded carvings which overwhelm by the sheer force of their numbers and lose their impact the longer you are there.

To give an example of its architectural splendour, Angkor Wat itself has more than 3,000 apsaras, or heavenly nymphs, carved into its walls, each one a unique design. There are 37 different hairstyles shared between them, also.

Now archeologically, that is remarkable. But seriously, how long do you want to stand around, looking at wall carvings? And while each might be unique, the differences are very subtle, so they don’t immediately strike you as individuals. While these are lovely carvings, how massively different do they look?

The carvings are superb, don’t get me wrong. You’ll note the faces of these ones are scratched out – that’s probably because the Khmer Rouge abolished religion and would often deface or behead any Buddhist imagery.

1461721_10153628956845241_1004384247_nAs I said, Angkor Wat is worth looking around for a while. Here’s some of what I saw.

This corridor was covered with carvings, depicting a variety of scenes, and as such this was a good place to linger and take it all in. Here’s a close up.

And here’s some of those lovely nymphs. Hello, ladies…

Here’s the best looking nymph of them all.

It was blisteringly hot that day, so any shady spot was highly desirable. I never noticed this before I posted this first photo, but check out the living Buddha on the left side.

The grounds are worth a quick look, but the best thing about what’s there is that it’s all so big and sprawled out. Otherwise it’s nothing special.


You can get up high in Angkor Wat and check out the view.

575443_10153628966215241_455528629_nWhich looks like this.

And this.

But after an hour, an hour and a half max – push off. There are much better sights to drink in, just down the road.

When we left Angkor Wat, Adventurous Kate and I hopped back into our tuk tuk, driven by the excellent Mr Mean.

Friendly, always laughing and smiling, handing out bottles of chilled water, you’ll struggle to find a nicer chap than Mr Mean.

I liked saying his name a lot, because it was so at odds with his demeanour. (It turns out you pronounce his name Me-An, but he introduced himself as Mr Mean, so it stuck). If you ever go to Siem Reap, visit New Angkorland hotel (a very decent place to stay and quite reasonably priced) and ask for Mr Mean as we booked him through its reception, so they should have his details.

He took us down the road to Bayon, part of the city of Angkor Thom and on the way you pass these fellows on a bridge with a once-grand entrance, making you feel like you’re entering a secretive, lost city which could count King Kong among its residents.

Now this place is more like it – smaller, and largely crumbled, it nevertheless has much more personality than Angkor Wat.

There are carvings here, but not so many that you become blasé about them.

There’s so much charm about this place.

Bayon is a Buddhist temple and has 37 towers, most sporting four carved faces.

1465214_10153628981530241_155999281_nThe many faces to be seen at Bayon are similar, but located in different parts and positions around the temple, making them very photographable. They’re thought to be of Loksvara, Mahayana Buddhism’s compassionate Bodhisattva, or perhaps a combination of Buddha and Jayavarman VII, the king who built the temple.

My money’s on the latter. You know kings and queens and authority figures everywhere – they give, but they like to be recognised for having done so.

1486833_10153628983875241_1211641003_nAfter a spot of lunch, Mr Mean expertly took us to my favourite part of the temple complex, the brilliant Ta Prohm.

I’ve a three-temple maximum, as I’ve previously mentioned in other blog posts. This was the third of the day, the best and one of the most remarkable I’ve ever seen.

1456061_10153628994570241_2080326739_nThis temple complex was abandoned for centuries, and as a result has been overgrown by giant trees, who have dismissed man’s feeble attempts at making a mark on the land, simply pushing their way past mere stone.

1461860_10153629012040241_179151178_nIt now looks like where Indiana Jones would go for a weekend break, and actually the first Tomb Raider movie was filmed here. Closest I’ll ever get to Angelina Jolie, probably, although I did used to live on the road where Lara Croft and her game was created, in Derby.   

Someone should tell the CIA that the FBI are now running overseas operations. And on a tight budget, clearly.

The place is quite eerie.

1497452_10153629002245241_1159445123_n

It made me wonder, again, what the world would look like if human life vanished from it.

These roots were so big, they now have to be supported.

I spotted this woman having her picture taken in one of the roots. This is clearly a theme of hers, but whatever it is, that dinosaur is quality.

What remains of the inside of the temple still has much to offer.

1456793_10153628999755241_91411417_nHere’s another Buddha to be found inside Ta Prohm.

Finally, Mr Mean took us to Banteay Kdei, a monastic complex which is in poor repair but is slowly being restored. Now this did break my three-temple rule, but despite feeling a touch of temple fatigue, I enjoyed seeing this one also.

The late afternoon light played happily with what is left of this mainly ruined site, and made for some interesting shapes.


This site may be ruined but it’s still worth a visit.

This kid was curious to see what was in the Big Blue Box parked near the temple’s entrance, but sadly for him there didn’t seem to be anything in there.

While inside we came across this Buddhist shrine. I was told that the Buddha’s head is new, because the Khmer Rouge beheaded it and destroyed the original.

The nun you see here gave Kate and I a blessing and tied coloured string round our wrists. I wondered if they’d last the week, but more than a month later, it’s still on both our wrists!

So if you go on the hunt for Cambodia’s temples, these are four that you should definitely check out, and you can do them in less than a day.

Finally, as we left Banteay Kdei, I bought a Coke for Kate, Mr Mean and me. The woman who sold them was a charmer – look at that smile!

That’s all for my time in fascinating, if occasionally frustrating Cambodia.