Posts Tagged ‘Wat Pho’

SOTM World Tour – Bangkok

Friday, January 24th, 2014

When I was a boy, growing up in Malta, I often heard a song on the radio called One Night In Bangkok.

I loved it, recorded it onto a tape and then listened to it all the time. When I got into my teens I discovered it came from the musical Chess, the music for which was written by Benny and Bjorn from Abba.

Amusingly, there’s a lyric in One Night In Bangkok that goes: “If you’re lucky then the God’s a she.” I couldn’t work out what it said, so I used to sing: “If you’re lucky then they’ve got some sheep.”

Well, I was about eight.

Anyway, some 32 years later, I landed in Bangkok for the first time. And I loved it.

It’s fun. It’s crowded. It’s friendly. It’s polluted, cheap and occasionally smelly. Lots of people speak English. It is easy to travel around as a backpacker, so those seeking a challenge should look elsewhere.

But if you want a bloody good time, then spend much longer than one night in this crazy town.

Let me pick a few highlights from my time in Bangers, as I affectionately called it. First up, Chinatown. Incidentally the top image is Kate and me in the back of a tuk tuk, returning from a happy afternoon in that place.

It’s a wonderful, narrow labyrinth of shops, stalls, clothes, motorbikes, Hello Kitty phone covers, dried squid, handbags, and lots, lots more. You name it, you can buy it or eat it here. We had two bowls of tasty noodle soup, in a place where no-one spoke English and the paint was peeling off the walls and the electrics looked past retirement, for 40p each.

Here’s a typical Chinatown side street, and there are some which are narrower.

1383668_10153379074740241_719704391_nThe shops here all very well stocked.

582345_10153379084765241_846717404_nBikes squeeze in and out of the tiny, streets crowded by people, boxes, and other bikes.

Outside of Italy, I’ve never seen so many Vespas. They are hugely popular here, and many are quite old. I’ve decided to own one someday.

He looked like he’d done that before. At least, I hope he had.

Here’s a brand I’ve never heard of before, although it does have a familiar ring to it…

There’s so much choice in Chinatown that it’s impossible to make a quick decision.

Housewives and househusbands could spend hours in here.

You want wigs? They got wigs.

1174665_10153379073750241_983108897_nHappily Kate and I never got close to breaching my three-temple maximum during our time in the Thai capital. We went for quality over quantity, and it was an excellent move.

We took a trip on a crowded boat down the river to the marvellous Wat Arun.

It has a startling level of detail, its facade being incredibly intricate.

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1174578_10153379048060241_1012656437_nThe view from higher up the temple.

1393826_10153379051770241_1534753705_nAnd guess what – while at Wat Arun I found those sheep I used to sing about!

Continuing the animal theme, I came across these fellows. Never mind the identity of the fifth Beatle, who’s this fourth monkey?

1382415_10153352637875241_482481115_nAway from temples, Kate and I spent a lot of time on the streets of the legendary Khaosan Road and its adjacent streets, as we were staying nearby. Here she is about to feast on our favourite, mango with sticky rice.

1393572_10153379032010241_2084350870_nGrazing for street food is a smashing, and fun way, to fill your stomach with tasty treats, for very little cash.

1381841_10153379036325241_289259284_n

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1395946_10153379026920241_694358514_nIt may be street food, but someone’s still got to do the washing up.

Eating isn’t the only thing that goes down on Bangkok’s streets. Here I am – well, a bit of me – getting my first ever foot massage.

And that’s not all you can do on Bangkok’s streets. A mushroom-shaped button on the fly of my jorts (jean shorts) came off, because the hole it was stitched into became too big. So I found this lady sitting on the side of a busy road in Pra Athit with her sewing machine.

She actually used a lot of thread and a needle to close the hole up, and charged me an embarrassing mere 20 baht – about 40p.

As she was sewing, I could imagine her thinking: “This man’s an idiot. He needs a wife, because he’s so stupid he can’t even sew and is clearly going to die unless someone looks after him.”

I thanked her and retreated, with jorts that no longer exposed my pants, but with my pride somewhat dented…

Later on, Kate and I were joined by my 20-year-old nephew, Isaac, the son of my sister Antwanette. He’d never been out of Europe or backpacking before, so I figured it was time for him to Man Up and come on the road with us for a couple of weeks.

While we were waiting for him in arrivals, I spotted these chaps cleaning the airport windows.

And here he is, pictured straight off the plane.

1463894_10153560133230241_1133579641_nHe’s 6’4 so not exactly difficult to spot in a crowd. I remember him the day after he was born, when I could pick him up in my hands and when he was a lot pinker. He still cries a lot and wears a nappy, though. (Probably).

We had a lot of fun with Thaissac, as I began calling him. He took to the backpacking life like a trooper, booking buses and trains and picking up basic phrases with which to greet the locals.

We took him to Wat Pho, also known as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha.

Here is the great, big, incredibly long idol, which looks good but doesn’t move much. And the Buddha.

1474502_10153674098285241_68273683_nThe Buddha is 46 metres long, is covered in gold leaf and is unforgettable.

The whole temple complex is filled with a dizzying array of Buddhas. This is a classic shot that I’ve seen done before, but thought I might as well get my own version done.

1530393_10153674230560241_1357652267_n And there are many indoor temples to be seen here too, which are incredibly splendid.

Back on the streets of Bangkok, Thaissac and I went to dunk our tootsies in a large fish tank, for them to nibble on.

It was an… odd experience. Bordering on the unpleasant at times, very ticklish, and not like anything I’d ever experienced before.

1470069_10153568546145241_1496097039_nI had LOADS of fish around me, as you can see here, while Thaissac had about 12.

1454649_10153568546365241_1809186530_nThen a large Thai lady came in, and solemnly gestured to Thaissac to move across to the next tank. He did so and immediately started yelping like a wounded sea lion. Turns out that particular tank was filled with very hungry fish.

While Thaissac was begging for mercy, the Thai lady banged on the glass wall dividing us, broke out into a grin and gave us the thumbs up. I laughed my head off while Thaissac prayed that he’d get out with all 10 toes. There’s a video of us both struggling to deal with the beasties, too.

At one point, Kate and I held a meet up in Bangkok, which was a lot of fun. Many travel bloggers and a few backpackers turned up for quite a popular meeting.

It turned out to be a Big Night Out, ending at around 4am, but before then I managed to get a few people to take part in SOTM. Here’s the excellent Steve Schreck, who writes at A Backpacker’s Tale.

And this is the lovely Kate Button, who had never revealed this story about her dad before.

And this is the inimitable Jeremy Foster, who writes at Travel Freak.

Finally, before Thaissac, Kate and I left town, we went to the Lumpinee stadium to watch some Muay Thai boxing.

This was an idea that I insisted upon doing. I’d read great things about it, and we weren’t disappointed. It was an amazing evening.

While the stadium is charmingly ramshackle, the organisation was pretty smooth. We were approached by a ticket seller draped in Muay Thai garb outside the stadium, who politely showed us a laminated sheet with a choice of tickets.

As advised, we went for the most expensive ones, priced at 2,000 baht, which are ringside. This isn’t a cheap ticket, but it’s serious value for money.

We were then whisked through to our seats inside, plastic chairs close to the ring, where all the foreigners sit. The interior does look like it might fall down soon, with patched-up corrugated roof, fans wobbling in the ceiling and lots of sweating, shouting Thais.

But the whole thing is hypnotising and it frankly looked and sounded exactly how I hoped it might. This stadium is actually closing next year, to be replaced by a new one elsewhere in the city, and while it’s always good to have new facilities, I fear that something will be lost when the action moves to plusher premises.

1491771_10153699118650241_1439802114_nBehind us were rows of mostly Thai men, who were betting in certain strictly-controlled areas. There were nine bouts, starting with teenagers and moving up through the age ranges, until we reached the main fight, which was bout seven.

As the action moved through the rounds, and the winner or loser was soon to be decided, the roars of the crowd crashed upon us like waves. It all seemed to depend on who’d bet on whom, and also which of a boxer’s family members were in the audience. I think I spotted a few mums here and there during the fighting.

I wasn’t able to move or stand up or use a flash, so while I took a few shots I was quite limited in what I could do photographically. Still, I managed to get a few decent shots.

There are lots of rituals attached to Muay Thai, and there is a clear emphasis on respect for one’s opponent and surroundings.

76856_10153699294705241_1929321929_nThis chap was the winner of bout seven, the main event of the evening.

1546335_10153699318885241_1444275655_nAfterwards, we were able to queue up and have our photo taken with him, rounding off a superb evening.

Next time, Kate, Thaissac and I head north to Chiang Mai, Pai and us two lads get tickled by the trunks of elephants.